BuildLog.Net - Document your builds!


Buildlog Title: Scott's 2.x Log

newest first oldest first
Builder: sshwarts
Member Since: 2014-04-22

Tuesday, May 3rd 2016 - 2:20 PM

You don't have to use the OpenSCAD files to scale it, I just found it very useful.

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: Biotech1 on Wednesday, April 20th 2016 - 1:13 AM
Hello Scott I'm just starting my build right now I am researching all parts to buy but I want a bigger machine do I need to download Scad for your scale to work...
reader comment Comment from: bloq on Thursday, March 12th 2015 - 3:08 PM
Awesome! Thank you so much. It is good to know that there are still people here who can help. Thank you so much!

Wednesday, March 11th 2015 - 3:31 PM

Hi! Yes you're correct that only the Y axis stepper needs to be dual shaft. I bought mine from inventables: https://www.inventables.com/technologie ... or-nema-17

There's not a whole lot of mass it's moving on the X axis and with the dual shaft arrangement on the Y, these seems to do very well. The laser head is really always on the move unlike a CNC where to hold position and then put torque on the axis(s) as you cut.

I wouldn't be overly worried about the drivers personally. There's a number of sources for these in particular besides LO. I don't see why you couldn't mix tho I'd personally match XY and not care too much about Z.

Scott

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: bloq on Wednesday, March 11th 2015 - 6:35 AM
Hey Scott!

awesome! Thank you very much! If i may ask 2 more questions. Do you know more about the Nemas? I am a little bit uncertain regarding
the holding power and length of the nemas. And: The BOM says dual shaft but as far as i can see only one of the nemas needs to be dual shaft?
the drivers look good but i have a question: Do you think mixing would be possible? Lightobject does not write too much about the
drivers and i wonder what happens if they are not offered anymore.

once again:

thank you!

Tuesday, March 10th 2015 - 11:00 PM

Thanks for the kind words. The source code is available here: https://github.com/sshwarts/2.xLaser/
As are all the STL files for the parts I 3D printed.

I used NEMA 17 steppers. 200 step/rev.
I used three of these drivers: http://www.lightobject.com/Mini-2-Phase ... -P650.aspx

I bought a 24V DC 14.6A 350W Regulated Switching Power Supply on eBay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/24V-DC-14-6A-35 ... 3cd0b1c717

The daughter board I built has a buck converter on it to take the 24V down to 9V for the Arduino. It also has a 5V regulator to power the red dot laser target and the relay boards: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00E0NTPP4/

I used 22/4 Stranded shielded to go from the Steppers to the drivers and from drivers to AWC-608. For all the internal wiring (not counting 120V), I used 22 AWG. It all runs in sleeves (Techflex 1/8" Expandable Sleeving). Wiring from limit switches was twisted pair (salvaged from ethernet cables).

Ask away any questions!

Scott

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: bloq on Tuesday, March 10th 2015 - 12:29 PM
´╗┐Hey Scott,

i really would love to get the code for the arduino sub subsystem. I am still in the beginning but i have some experience with arduinos and would love to work on that subsystem.

Furthermore i would like to ask you regarding some details because your build looks like you really know what you are doing:

1. What drivers and steppers did you get?
2. Which power supply did you use (for steppers and the rest)
3. What i did not find any information about yet: What wires did you use for the connections between power and awc 608 and all the drivers?

thanks a lot!

tm

Monday, March 9th 2015 - 2:00 PM

Hi. My picture is wrong. You have to take the black pro head, not the plain/silver one. The black head has its entry hole higher up.

You have a choice then, if you want the lens further down then you can remove the threaded insert to the black head and put the silver one in. Or you can use it as is. I'm not sure yet which is better.

edit: I just tried both. I find I like using the plain silver piece better simply because it's less likely I'll rotate the head accidentally when I remove the lens for cleaning. So it's black head, silver threaded, black nozzle.

Then as I had previously written, I made an extension out of plastic (3D printed) to move the actual nozzle down closer to the work.

Scott

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: Techbuilder on Monday, March 9th 2015 - 9:06 AM
Hey Scott I purchased the pro mounts as well from light object and have caused me nothing but pain with getting it to work correctly
last thing I've run into is the laser head is about a 1/2" to short. Did you make a spacer for the head or how about did you get by that issue?

Image
reader comment Comment from: Techbuilder on Thursday, January 29th 2015 - 5:09 AM
Perfect! I took your picture into solid works and measured my stepper to get a base and came up with 1.500 inches as well.
I then ordered these on amazon
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AO4 ... UTF8&psc=1

I wasn't completely sure it was correct since your stepper could of been a different length but looks like I got lucky
reader comment Comment from: pourcirm on Monday, January 26th 2015 - 11:44 PM
Hey Techbuilder,

I actually had them in my spare parts box from building my ShapeOko, but I think I originally got them from McMaster Carr. They're just metal standoffs, pretty cheap and easy. Mine are an inch and a half tall which worked out perfectly for me.

Ryan
reader comment Comment from: Techbuilder on Monday, January 26th 2015 - 8:00 AM
pourcirm wrote:I actually did something very similar. If you put the spacers on the motor you don't have to use the second bearing plate below the motor plate. I saw it on an older buildlog, but I can't remember who came up with the idea first as I've read so many people's posts while working on mine.

20141006_213616.jpg



Hey pourcirm,

I love this idea!
Where did you get the stand offs if you don't mind me asking?

Thursday, January 1st 2015 - 4:38 PM

My final optics and nozzle are sort of a hybrid. I use a combination of the LO 18~20mm Focus lens Mount <http://www.lightobject.com/1820mm-Focus-lens-Mount-P204.aspx? to hold the mirror and 18~20mm Laser head w/ air assist <http://www.lightobject.com/1820mm-Laser-head-w-air-assisted-Ideal-for-K40-machine-P701.aspx> to give me the lens mount and air assist nozzle. This part by itself won't fit properly in the plate, hence the mash up.

I was never happy with the fact that the nozzle was so far away from the work piece with the 50.8mm lens, not to mention potentially loosing power because the beam was still wide before it go to the waist. So I made on the 3D printer an extension to it. It's available here if anyone wants it:

https://github.com/sshwarts/2.xLaser/bl ... ension.stl

Printed in ABS which should be ok unless my alignment is way off. If someday I have a metal lathe, I'll turn one (anyone want to do one?)

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: sports.racer on Tuesday, November 18th 2014 - 3:10 PM
Macintosh Quadra 950


My CNC router's drive board and power supply live in an old Macintosh IIci case. That case was a great design.

Friday, November 14th 2014 - 5:24 PM

I used this one from SDP: A 6Z16-913025

Single Sided .080" (MXL) 913 0.25 Neoprene Fiberglass 73.04 length

If I remember correctly, the length was based on what they had in stock!

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: injunear on Friday, November 14th 2014 - 6:16 AM
What belt did you use for the Z axis and who did you get it from? I thought I saved a link a couple months ago for a supplier but now I can't find it. I went to SDP website but I can't find anything there that'll work for me. I see that McMaster Carr has a 77" belt but wanted to check with you first. Maybe I can do better.

I need a belt from say 70" to 90" depending on how far apart I want to spread the lift plate mounts.

Thanks again
Bob T.
reader comment Comment from: MitchL on Thursday, November 6th 2014 - 2:38 AM
sshwarts wrote:Mitch,
My control system is pretty similar. I don't turn on and off the laser psu though just leaving it on when main power is on. I also detect when the laser is firing and keep track of the total time the tube has on it (as well as the particular run). Have to tweak my code though, engraving I found throws it off a bit (sample rate).


The Arduino is what turns everything else on for my laser. I wanted to have "user IDs" at some point, particularly if I let the robotics team at the school use it, so this way I can make sure the laser won't start without at least a little bit of access control.

My odometer counts when OUTPUT2 is high (it's the one that is normally used for the air assist solenoid). I think it's reading way too high, as it thinks I've got a couple of hours on my tube now and I'm still running test jobs. More tweaking. I suppose to get actual laser tube active I'd have to wire the 'L' input to the laser PSU onto the Arduino.

Total job runtime is an excellent idea, I will add that to mine :-).

Have to add light show LEDs though, only have white ones on the x axis makerslide for visibility . Cool idea.


Yeah, total bling but it looks neat. I don't yet have skins on my laser, but having interior LEDs will be very useful when everything's buttoned up. Since I have RGB LEDs I can choose a contrasting color when the red dot is turned on, for example.

At one time I was thinking of tapping into the digital ma meter to see if I could get some data out of it to feed to the arduino (via optoisolator).


There's a thought - I was poking at isolation amplifiers and other things. I bugged some of the EEs at work about how to do this, they got spooked when I mentioned it was for a laser power supply :-). Hacking up the digital meter is an interesting thought!

/Mitch.

Wednesday, November 5th 2014 - 11:40 PM

Mitch,
My control system is pretty similar. I don't turn on and off the laser psu though just leaving it on when main power is on. I also detect when the laser is firing and keep track of the total time the tube has on it (as well as the particular run). Have to tweak my code though, engraving I found throws it off a bit (sample rate).

Have to add light show LEDs though, only have white ones on the x axis makerslide for visibility . Cool idea.

At one time I was thinking of tapping into the digital ma meter to see if I could get some data out of it to feed to the arduino (via optoisolator).

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: MitchL on Wednesday, November 5th 2014 - 7:38 PM
Hi Scott,

Nice build - I have not posted a log of my nearly-completed laser publicly (yet), but like you I've built a supervisor controller for my machine, with an Arduino and a touchpanel. I think it adds great functionality.

Which LCD panel did you use?
What things inside your laser are connected to the Arduino?
Did you have any issues with electrical noise? (I did until I added some extra capacitors in key places).

Here's a list of what my supervisor does, you could easily add these things to your controller if you find them useful:

- Analog inputs:
Coolant temperature (inlet to laser),
Laser temperature (coolant at output from laser)
- Digital inputs:
E-Stop
Coolant flow rate (liters/min).
Door and front access panel interlocks to enable/disable the laser
AWC608's "output1" and "output2" signals to detect job running and laser firing
- Digital outputs:
Red dot
Power relays for laser PSU, Stepper PSU, AWC, Chiller power, Air Assist power, Exhaust fan power,
Relays for laser PSU's protect signal, AWC608's "input1" and "input2" (one of these is the "footswitch")
PWM LEDs for inside the laser.

The Arduino is responsible for power-up sequencing. I might add a PIN code there someday so that one can track laser users.

To protect the laser tube, I can kill the enable signal if the coolant pump isn't running or the temperature is too high.
Knowing the cover is open, I can change the color of the interior LEDs when the laser is "armed"

My favorite thing is getting around an issue I have with the AWC608 - when you start a job, there's no way to program a pause before the laser starts. I don't want to run the air assist or exhaust all the time. The laser starts too quickly for the compressor or exhaust to get to speed.

If you go into LaserCAD you can enable the "footswitch control" input. This works like a pause/resume button. My Arduino watches for the job to start (OUTPUT1), then immediately pulses the footswitch for 100ms (the gantry hasn't even had a chance to move to the home position yet). I can now start the exhaust and the air assist, wait for them to come up to speed, and pulse the footswitch again to continue the job. It works well. I wish the AWC had a real programmable delay here, but this will do.

If I can work out an isolated way to do it, it'd be very awesome to measure the laser power on the Arduino and graph power over time. Has anybody tried to do that?

/Mitch.

Saturday, November 1st 2014 - 7:45 PM

It's my modified B17017 (called B17017Rev.stl on my github). Yes,I just added a tab (and removed the hole of the old one). Total standoff height was one inch.

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: injunear on Thursday, October 30th 2014 - 4:01 AM
pourcirm wrote:I actually did something very similar. If you put the spacers on the motor you don't have to use the second bearing plate below the motor plate. I saw it on an older buildlog, but I can't remember who came up with the idea first as I've read so many people's posts while working on mine.

20141006_213616.jpg


Scott, is that the original mounting bracket B17017 or the modified bracket? Can't tell from the photo.
What length of standoff's?

I've been studying the difference between the 'modified' and the original and it looks like the only difference is a mounting tab that was added. True?


Bob T.
reader comment Comment from: injunear on Tuesday, October 21st 2014 - 8:54 PM
Thanks..It's time for me to order these things. Procrastinated enough.

Tuesday, October 21st 2014 - 7:58 PM

I bought this one for the air assist hose:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009IM ... UTF8&psc=1

I bought two of them and put them together (in parts) to get the length wanted.

I bought this one:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00880 ... UTF8&psc=1

For the X axis.

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: injunear on Tuesday, October 21st 2014 - 2:57 AM
Did you buy your cable and hose carrier (drag link cable) yet? If so, do you have a source? I've been putting this off for a while now. I see they sell them on amazon and probably ebay but I don't know what the dimensions are and I know little or nothing about these things in general. I did some reading on McMaster Carr and they're pretty simple to understand but on amazon they keep using the term 'nested' on some of the chains and I have no idea what 'nested' vs. not nested refers to.
I thought I saw in one of these build logs some dimensions but it's too long ago to recall where. Only need to know the width and height. The length of course depends on your build. Mine, and yours is larger than the stock 2.x.

Bob T.

edit- a simple search in the forum here yielded a thread that was discussing the original part numbers. It didn't take long to figure out that one drag chain is 10Hx20W (mm) for the Gantry and the lower chain is 15Hx37W (mm), both can be found on amazon.
reader comment Comment from: injunear on Saturday, October 18th 2014 - 1:00 AM
sshwarts wrote:Yea I noticed that (they were out of business). A shame, good price. The local supplier here (and at other locations in the country) is N.Glantz & Son <http://www.nglantz.com/>. This is where my local sign guy gets his panels.


Yeah, I found them online yesterday. I wasn't sure if they would sell to me. They're about 35 miles from where I live so it's a trip.

Bob T.

Friday, October 17th 2014 - 3:17 PM

Yea I noticed that (they were out of business). A shame, good price. The local supplier here (and at other locations in the country) is N.Glantz & Son <http://www.nglantz.com/>. This is where my local sign guy gets his panels.

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: injunear on Friday, October 17th 2014 - 4:45 AM
Hmm, this company (XP Sign Supplies) seems to be no more, or at least the website isn't working anymore. Too bad as I'm trying to expand my choices of suppliers for ACP because my current supplier is reluctant to ship UPS.
Bob T.
reader comment Comment from: pourcirm on Friday, October 17th 2014 - 1:03 AM
I actually did something very similar. If you put the spacers on the motor you don't have to use the second bearing plate below the motor plate. I saw it on an older buildlog, but I can't remember who came up with the idea first as I've read so many people's posts while working on mine.

20141006_213616.jpg

Thursday, October 16th 2014 - 6:37 PM

Here''s another view of the Z motor assembly that moves the motor to the bottom of the table area instead of being right up against the tube.
z-Assembly.jpeg

If anyone wants the STL files, you can find them here:

https://github.com/sshwarts/2.xLaser

add commentadd comment in the forum

Friday, September 26th 2014 - 6:46 PM

I wanted to post where I sourced some of my materials to help other with their build. All of the plastic parts I 3D printed either in Bridge Nylon (any moving related part) or in PLA if I needed strength and rigidity.

-Skins
I bought Aluminum Composite Panel 3mm Gloss/Matte in blue heron from XP Sign Supplies (xpsignsupplies.com). Because I knew I would be 3D printing panels for the controls and the back AC outlet, I wasn't going to need to do any routing. Any holes I needed to make I made with drill, hole saw, and sabre saw. I had them pre-cut the panels for me and then I just trimmed where needed with table saw and chop saw. Total cost was $91.72 with shipping.

-Solenoid Valve
For the air assist, I bought this one:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008IG ... UTF8&psc=1

-Connectors
To run power to the 24V blower and the water pump I used these connectors:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00067 ... UTF8&psc=1
http://www.amazon.com/Neutrik-NAC3FCA-P ... 2KT6HD5NS0

-Vent Connector
This is the connector on the back for the blower hose:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AX5 ... UTF8&psc=1

-Air Assist Tubing
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007PG ... UTF8&psc=1

There's other sources. If anyone wants to know something in particular, please ask.

add commentadd comment in the forum

Sunday, September 21st 2014 - 7:52 PM

BTW, on start-up the touchscreen displays one of two screens:
sharks_with_frickin.jpg
sharks_with_frickin.jpg (19.02 KiB) Viewed 10842 times

laser.jpg
laser.jpg (16.59 KiB) Viewed 10842 times

add commentadd comment in the forum

Sunday, September 21st 2014 - 7:47 PM

Thanks for the compliment. It doesn't take that long. For example, printing the Z motor mount (the standard one, B17008) takes about :45. Now I can plate more than one part at a time on my 250mmx200mm bed so time goes up from there but given that I can be doing other things while the printer prints, it's a good use of time. Slow is a relative thing. I can start a print job and then go off and have dinner with my wife. This is time I would not be spending in the shop normally. I can't trust the router or the laser for that matter to run without me baby-sitting the job.

Scott

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: injunear on Sunday, September 21st 2014 - 2:24 AM
Wow, very nice, especially the front panel. You say you printed all the plastic parts? I have to ask, how long did that take? It now takes me about 4 hours to cut and mill all the parts from HDPE on my CNC Router. I can't imagine thermal printing them. It must've taken days, weeks, no? I don't have a 3D Printer but it's on my 'wish' list but from all I've read in various forums from guys using them is that they're sloooooow......

Bob T.

Wednesday, September 17th 2014 - 1:50 PM

Enraged wrote:Very nice build!
Do you have any addition info on the Uno and touchscreen? Did you develope it yourself or get the code somewhere?


I built it myself. What it consists of is a Uno, an Adafruit Proto-Screwshield (http://www.adafruit.com/products/196) and a Adafruit 2.8" TFT touchscreen (http://www.adafruit.com/products/1651).

On the protoshield are optoisolators (https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9118) to take the Laser Firing input form the DSP (which is pulled up to 24V, not 5V contrary to what was posted on LO's forum). It also takes the input from the water flow switch. On the output side, there's an optoisolator going to one of the protect inputs on the DSP. While I didn't add it to the code, the Arduino watches the cover switch for example and then could trigger the protect input. Later I might also have the Arduino watch coolant temp and do the same thing.

To switch the various systems, I used these:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00E0N ... UTF8&psc=1

Happy to share source code or STL files for the case, bezel, etc. if anyone wants it.

Scott

add commentadd comment in the forum

reader comment Comment from: Enraged on Tuesday, September 16th 2014 - 9:38 PM
Very nice build!

Do you have any addition info on the Uno and touchscreen? Did you develope it yourself or get the code somewhere?

Monday, September 15th 2014 - 11:35 PM

This log is a little bit disjointed in that I'm posting it after the fact to help any others who want to take this on. Feel free to ask any questions you might have and I'm happy to share my files, source code, etc.

As I write this, here's what my build looks like now:
done.JPG


I started the project in April 2014 and now in Sept, I'm making my first cuts and finishing up odds and ends. I started by looking as most do at the various others designs (Blacktooth, Lasersaur) as well as Chinese eBay lasers, Full Spectrum, etc etc. I settled on the buildlog 2.x design as the most flexible and I also had some previous experience with CNC machines, 3D printers and even makerslide).

I knew wanted to scale the design a little bit to accept roughly 18x24 sheets so I used the parametric_buildlog_laser tool (http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:12864) to scale it up and create my list for Misumi.
frame.jpg

My other goal was to print all the plastic parts. For the end plates and lens carriage, I was lucky enough to buy a set from one of the users here and all I had to do was sand them a bit and have them anodized.
plates.JPG

The plastic parts that would support moving parts, I printed in Nylon so that they would have a little bit of give but yet be strong. The other parts were printed in PLA for rigidity and strength. So for example, this part is the Z motor mount printed in Bridge Nylon (Tauman). I moved the motor to the bottom of the frame instead of the top because I didn't like how close the whole assembly was to the tube and I wanted the tube within a few inches of the first mirror.
IMG_1398.jpg

Here's an example of where I used PLA. All the electronics is mounted across the rails in the electronics bay. I added a middle rail and then made mounts for each of the items. These set of mounts hold the 24V power supply. In this way I avoided needing a tray for the electronics and the extra weight.
IMG_1408.jpg

Here's another example. This part holds the water input and output as well as the solenoid valve for the air assist.
IMG_1394.jpg

Here's the tube brackets:
IMG_1395.jpg

Here's more pictures from the electronics bay. The part standing up with parts on perf board is my power supply card. It has a 24V-9V buck converter to power the Arduino subsystems controller, as well as the relay modules for the water pump, air compressor, blower, and aux. It also has to five volt supplies. One for the relays, and an isolated supply for the ma meter. The second relay module laying down is for the solenoid valve on the air assist.
IMG_1411.jpg

This is the front panel area. The AWC-608 controller sits on top. On the front is a touch screen interface to an Arduino Uno which controls the sub-subsystems. It also keeps track of the laser running time of the job and total time on the laser tube. Brought out to the front are all the AWC-608 inputs (Ethernet, USB, USB key) and the all important, "Oh Sh**" button. Trivia fact, the key switch is from a Macintosh Quadra 950 that's been in my parts drawer for going on some 17 years!
IMG_1406.jpg

add commentadd comment in the forum

About Us | Contact | ę2010 BuildLog.Net